October 15, 2009 Volume CXXVI Issue 5

David Crowder Band breaks genre lines

By MOLLY SHOULTA
Staff Writer

As if “Remedy” wasn’t good enough, along comes “Church Music.” While some of the songs are weird, psychedelic and just plain weird, you have managed to score another hit. What other Christian artist can sport a song titled “Church Music—Dance [!]” and get away with it?! None. Although I cannot say I’m the veteran David Crowder fan, I somehow began listening to their music on long car trips and began to dig deeper into more and more of their music. Their albums consistently show diversity from track to track and a fun spirit of worship. And they did it again.

If anyone has a bad David Crowder album, please let someone know because to this point, it’s highly doubtful. While their previous record, “Remedy,” boasted multiple hits to the airwaves, this one seems to be promising even more. Anyone who has seen this group in concert will certainly agree that the band has a spark for silliness and a heart for Christ. This shines through on the album over and over again. Though some of the “tamer” songs are the stronger songs on the CD are more moving and worship friendly, including “Alleluia, Sing,” “Eastern Hymn,” “SMS,” and “All Around Me.” “Shadows” proves to have a meaningful message, and the words are beautifully written to twist from the “shadows” that “fall on us,” to the “shadow of the cross.”

The most powerful song on the album is undoubtedly “How He Loves.” The inclusion of instruments of all sorts and gradual build throughout the song draws attention to the lyrics as they intensify as well as through the bridge. The band must believe, quite rightly, the upbeat songs can also speak to open ears and hearts. Take “Can I Lie Here,” a song that starts with a trailed off beat and vocals. Yes, your speakers are working correctly. “Oh, Happiness” is the song to get stuck in your head. The unique thing about the David Crowder Band is their ability to create songs for a slower paced worshipping crowd or a jumping, shouting group and everything in between; “God Almighty, None Compares” and “The Nearness” lend themselves to rocking out, but none- theless both exhibit a meaningful experience through lyrics.

Those new to David Crowder may not realize, or appreciate, the “Nintendo” sounds incorporated into multiple songs. Given, at first they’re annoying. For some of the tracks, the little add in noises will make or break it. But the crazy side of David Crowder can’t be ignored. “Church Music—Dance [!]” – point and case. Vocal scooping and crazy background noise make up a just plain fun song. The album starts off with “Phos Hilaron (Hail Gladdening Light),” which begins relatively calmly, but soon kicks it up a notch. DCB is not afraid to pull out some metal-esque music, but still manages to keep it their own. Ironically, the last track, “In The End (O Resplendent Light!)” takes listeners out on a similar note as the opening, only reversed. The beginning through middle of the song is somewhat heavy, but it trails off to a quiet goodbye.

“We Are Loved” and “What a Miracle” are similar in their sound, and probably confusable, but both still have distinct lyrics and music patterns. They are not the best on the album, but are certainly still decent. Almost any of the tracks could fall into the “techno” genre, though Christian Techno has yet to really find a foothold in the music world. Take a listen to “The Veil”—the Christian Rock version of “Sandstorm,” anyone? The song is still an interesting one to say the least. Similar in techno style is “Birmingham;” a very upbeat, repetitive melody line makes for a song you won’t want to skip. Every single song on the album is worth listening to. Some songs stand out over others, but altogether they piece together an album well worth buying. Overall, “Church Music” demonstrates what a perfect ten, five star album should be. Keep it up, David Crowder Band.


Featured Artist of the Week

Ashley Mitchell

artist

Hometown: Louisville, Ky.
Year: Senior
Major: Art
Sport: GC Softball

“Through my art, I am able to illustrate different experiences and ideas throughout my life. Each one of my pieces of art tells a story from my pastor present and what I hope for the future. My artwork allows me to create pieces that inspire me as well as to provide inspiration for my viewers. I try and keep my artwork simple with a hint of complication to add a little spice to the recipe. Here’s a little taste!”

“Through my art, I am able to illustrate different experiences and ideas throughout my life. Each one of my pieces of art tells a story from my pastor present and what I hope for the future. My artwork allows me to create pieces that inspire me as well as to provide inspiration for my viewers. I try and keep my artwork simple with a hint of complication to add a little spice to the recipe. Here’s a little taste!”


A Walk around campus

A brief description of the sculptures on campus
By EVAN HARRELL
Staff Writer

As you walk through and around main campus, you cannot help but notice some of the most unique pieces of art. They are part of the college’s Outdoor Sculpture Exhibition which, according to the pamphlets located beside each sculpture, “was sponsored by Richard Spears ‘57 and unveiled in 2007.” President of Georgetown College, Dr. William H. Crouch, Jr. had this to say about the exhibit: “Art is a critical dimension of any great liberal arts college. This wonderful exhibit adds a richness to the learning environment and becomes a wonderful benefit to our community.”

Unless you were actually looking for it or happened to trek by the corner of College andMulberry streets beside the LRC often, you maynot even know this piece exists. “Crossing (After Whitman)” was created by Allison Warren, Lecturerat the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. It consists of 17 granite stones, eachsilk-screened with text modeled after Walt Whitman’s “Song of the Open Road”.

Unless you were actually looking for it or happened to trek by the corner of College and Mulberry streets beside the LRC often, you may not even know this piece exists. “Crossing (After Whitman)” was created by Allison Warren, Lecturer at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. It consists of 17 granite stones, each silk-screened with text modeled after Walt Whitman’s “Song of the Open Road”.

plaque

At the corner of Mulberry and Jackson Streets sits the see-saw. Everyone who  has driven down Jackson has undoubtedly seen, if not used, this sculpture.“Pass the Lace through the Loop” is the artistry of Daniel Graham, Assistant Professor of Art here at Georgetown and was created in 2007. The materials used in the making of this piece are wood, steel and aluminum, and yes, it does actually work.

At the corner of Mulberry and Jackson Streets sits the see-saw. Everyone who has driven down Jackson has undoubtedly seen, if not used, this sculpture.“Pass the Lace through the Loop” is the artistry of Daniel Graham, Assistant Professor of Art here at Georgetown and was created in 2007. The materials used in the making of this piece are wood, steel and aluminum, and yes, it does actually work.

The “Pink Things,” as you may call them, were created in 2007, the idea of Leticia Bajuyo, Associate Professor of Art at Hanover College in Indiana. The actual title of the work is “Forces of Nature: Hurricanes and Slinkys,”and they are made of PVC tubing, steel, paint and artificial grass. You may view these as you stroll down Memorial Drive. However, though many do it anyway, I cannot advise you to sit upon them.

The “Pink Things,” as you may call them, were created in 2007, the idea of Leticia Bajuyo, Associate Professor of Art at Hanover College in Indiana. The actual title of the work is “Forces of Nature: Hurricanes and Slinkys,”and they are made of PVC tubing, steel, paint and artificial grass. You may view these as you stroll down Memorial Drive. However, though many do it anyway, I cannot advise you to sit upon them.

“Transit of Venus” by Robert Huff, Professor at the Myers School of Art at the University of Akron in Ohio, sits right outside of Giddings Hall. It stands two feet tall in a14-by-14 foot square of stones. You may have passed it, wondering when it was going to be finished or what used to be sitting on top of it. However, while it isn’t as straight and forward versatile as the see-saw, it is worth a look.

“Transit of Venus” by Robert Huff, Professor at the Myers School of Art at the University of Akron in Ohio, sits right outside of Giddings Hall. It stands two feet tall in a14-by-14 foot square of stones. You may have passed it, wondering when it was going to be finished or what used to be sitting on top of it. However, while it isn’t as straight and forward versatile as the see-saw, it is worth a look.

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